Crime, drug, and gun control
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Crime, drug, and gun control highlights of conference agreement on H.R. 3371, 102d Congress by

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Published by Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress in [Washington, D.C.] .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Crime prevention -- United States,
  • Firearms -- Law and legislation -- United States,
  • Drug control -- United States,
  • Gun control -- United States

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementcoordinated by Harry Hogan
SeriesMajor studies and issue briefs of the Congressional Research Service -- 1992, reel 4, fr. 00397
ContributionsHogan, Harry L, Library of Congress. Congressional Research Service
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination5 p.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15459637M

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The federal government and most of the states have some gun‐control laws. Federal and state laws prohibit alcoholics, drug addicts, mentally unbalanced people, or people with criminal records from owning guns. Some cities require a person to buy a license to own a gun and register the serial number of the weapon with the police. Get this from a library! Crime, drug, and gun control: summary of S. (nd Congress) as passed by the Senate. [Harry L Hogan; Library of Congress. Congressional Research Service.;]. Drugs and Gun Violence. Drugs don’t mix well with other drugs, and they don’t mix well with guns put you in a state of mind where you are more willing to make risky decisions, especially if that drug is have the ability to give you the excessive confidence (especially at high levels of intoxication) to build up the courage to do something you would never attempt. Get this from a library! Crime, drug, and gun control: comparison of major bills under consideration by the House Judiciary Committee, d Congress. [Keith Bea; Harry L Hogan; Library of Congress. Congressional Research Service.;].

The connection between drugs and crime is reflected in at least three types of crimes: Drug‐defined crimes, such as the possession, use, or sale of controlled substances, which violates drug laws. Crimes committed by drug users to get money to buy more drugs or crimes committed by persons under the influence of drugs. When you hear NRA president Wayne LaPierre call for armed guards in schools, know that his case is made, through many studies, in "More Guns, Less Crime: Understanding Crime and Gun Control Laws.   More Guns, Less Crime is an exhaustive analysis of the effect of gun possession on crime rates Mr. Lott’s book—and the factual arsenals of other pro-gun advocates—are helping to redefine the argument over guns and gun control.”—James Bovard, Wall Street Journal — James Bovard. Wall Street JournalPages: In contrast to the closing statement in the book description; "Casting aside ideology and abstractions, he cautions against the belief that there exists some gun control solution which, had we the political will to seize it, would substantially reduce violent crime.", the author suggests that several gun-controls be enacted while acknowledging /5.

More Guns, Less Crime is an exhaustive analysis of the effect of gun possession on crime rates. Mr. Lott’s book—and the factual arsenals of other pro-gun advocates—are helping to redefine the argument over guns and gun control.”—James Bovard, Wall Street Journal “Law and economics professor John R. Lott Jr. presents reams of. by virtue of restructuring our nation's approach to gun control.7 Far from striking a defensive posture, Lott claims that if more guns were on the street, fewer crimes would be committed.' This review of More Guns, Less Crime begins by examining Lott's major arguments: (1) violent crime is Cited by: 1. Then the New York miracle occurred. Franklin Zimring, a law professor, wrote a book about the city’s extraordinary transformation called “The City That Became Safe.” In 20 years, violent crime dropped to a small fraction (1/6th) of what it had been. The rate of gun . The Crime Bill outlawed the manufacture, sale, and possession of military-style assault weapons, but it expired in In , following a rash of shootings at U.S. schools, further gun-control legislation was passed by the Senate but was voted down by the House of Representatives.